Historians in Dark Times

With the history wars apparently over, how are professional historians making sense of the nation's past? And who's listening anyway?

Meet Ann McGrath, Frank Bongiorno and Margaret Hutchison - three of Canberra’s busiest historians, all adept at telling the stories both grand and granular that together have shaped the Australia in which we live today. In this lively panel discussion, we’ll explore the craft and the joy of historical research, the role of history in a turbulent world, and discover just how cut-throat the deceptively peaceful groves of academe can be.

Tickets: $15 (includes a complimentary glass of Canberra region wine or a soft drink)

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Participant Bios

Frank Bongiorno is Professor of History at the Australian National University, and has previously taught in universities in Australia and Britain. His books include The People’s Party: Victorian Labor and the Radical Tradition 1875-1914, The Sex Lives of Australians: A History and The Eighties: The Decade That Transformed Australia. He is a regular contributor to the media, was co-editor of the Australian Historical Association’s journal, History Australia, from 2013 to 2015, and is currently President of Honest History.

Margaret (Meggie) Hutchison is an Adjunct Lecturer at the University of New South Wales, Canberra. She completed her doctorate on Australia’s official war art scheme of the First World War in the School of History at the Australian National University in 2015. She has taught and published widely on war, art and memory and has been the recipient of a number of grants and awards, including an Australian Academy of the Humanities Travelling Fellowship.

Ann McGrath is a Professor of History and Director of the Australian Centre for Indigenous History at the Australian National University. Her most recent book, Illicit Love: Interracial Sex and Marriage in the United States and Australia won the NSW Premiers History Prize, General Category, 2016. She researches and presents history in a range of media, including the popular film Message from Mungo and she co-wrote How to Write History that People Want to Read with Ann Curthoys.